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A long road ahead: I learned so many things and would highly recommend this academy. You can change your cookie settings at any time. A Nutrition Scientist investigates the metabolic and physiological responses of the body to foods and nutrients. It does so, however, using a white, male voice of authority, rather than allowing Shields to speak for herself. Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity. Thus I could lose the weight yet still be able to eat any unhealthy food I wanted to when I wanted to because I was active.

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Fall, Spring, and Summer. This course relates scientific concepts of nutrition to the function of nutrients in basic life processes. It emphasizes individual needs; functions and sources of nutrients; current nutrition and health issues; scientific method for analysis and evaluation of nutrition information; dietary guidelines and current nutrition recommendations; digestion, absorption, and metabolism; health, fitness, and disease; nutrition in the life span; and food safety.

Students evaluate their food intake using several methods, including a computer diet analysis. As an honors course, it offers expanded analysis of lecture materials, increased dependence upon student participation on a daily basis, and the opportunity for students to conduct research in relevant areas of interest, and thus targets highly motivated students who are looking for a more challenging academic experience.

Human Performance and Sports Nutrition. None Acceptable for Credit: This course introduces nutrition concepts to individuals interested in sports, fitness, and health for various stages of the life cycle. It emphasizes current theories and practices related to nutrition and athletic performance. Topics include macro and micro nutrient intakes, hydration, pre- and post-event food, supplements and ergogenic aids, weight control, and body composition related to performance. The course also examines the cultural, sociological, and psychological influences related to nutrition, fitness, and athletic achievement.

Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition. This course examines the regional, ethnic, cultural, religious, historical, and social influences on food patterns, cuisines, and health as well as how food is viewed as an expression of cultural diversity. Students discuss, sample, and assess traditional foods of geographic areas and cultures. They also explore geographic factors in food availability, global food issues, dietary habits, religious influences on food culture, and nutrition problems of various ethnic groups.

The course also addresses nutrition consequences of ethnic food choices and sanitation and safety practices. This course focuses on the specific nutritional needs and problems in older adults.

Diet and nutritional issues related to aging in a contemporary society are examined from physiological, sociological, psychological, and economic perspectives. Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per unit. Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center approval.

This course provides students the opportunity to apply the theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship position in a professional setting under the instruction of a faculty-mentor and site supervisor.

It introduces students to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting, employability skills development, and examination of the world of work as it relates to the student's career plans. CSU Lecture 1 hour. This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in Nutrition that are not included in regular course offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title and number designation in the class schedule.

Occupational Cooperative Work Experience. Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities and learn new skills at work. Search Catalog Contents Index. Nutrition Overview Degrees Certificates Courses. Health Sciences Contact Information Chair: Energy is measured in Calories and is obtained from the body stores or the food we eat.

Glycogen is the main source of fuel used by the muscles to enable you to undertake both aerobic and anaerobic exercise. If you train with low glycogen stores, you will feel constantly tired, training performance will be lower, and you will be more prone to injury and illness.

Carefully planned nutrition must provide an energy balance and a nutrient balance. Like fuel for a car, the energy we need has to be blended. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans [1] recommends the following blend:. For the purposes of the following examples and calculations I will use the following values: The approximate energy yield per gram is as follows [3]: Our 60kg athlete requires grams of Carbohydrates, 84 grams of Fat and grams of Protein.

To obtain an estimate of your daily calorie requirements and the amount of Carbohydrates, Protein and Fat please enter your weight, hours of training and then select the Calculate button. The nature of the fat depends on the type of fatty acids that make up the triglycerides. All fats contain both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids but are usually described as 'saturated' or 'unsaturated' according to the proportion of fatty acids present.

Saturated fats are generally solid at room temperature and tend to be animal fats. Unsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature and are usually vegetable fats - there are exceptions e.

There are two types of carbohydrates - starchy complex carbohydrates and simple sugars. The simple sugars are found in confectionery, muesli bars, cakes and biscuits, cereals, puddings, soft drinks and juices and jam and honey but they also contain fat. Starchy carbohydrates are found in potatoes, rice, bread, wholegrain cereals, semi skimmed milk, yogurt, fruit, vegetables, beans and pulses. Both types effectively replace muscle glycogen. The starchy carbohydrates are the ones that have all the vitamins and minerals in them as well as protein.

They are also low in fat as long as you do not slap on loads of butter and fatty sauces. The starchy foods are much bulkieo so there can be a problem in actually eating that amount of food so supplementing with simple sugar alternatives is necessary.

Your digestive system converts the carbohydrates in food into glucose, a form of sugar carried in the blood and transported to cells for energy. The glucose, in turn, is broken down into carbon dioxide and water.

Any glucose not used by the cells is converted into glycogen - another form of carbohydrate that is stored in the muscles and liver. However, the body's glycogen capacity is limited to about grams; once this maximum has been reached, any excess glucose is quickly converted into fat. Base your main meal with the bulk on your plate filled with carbohydrates and small amounts of protein such as meat, poultry and fish.

Lactose intolerance results when the mucosal cells of the small intestine fail to produce lactase that is essential for the digestion of lactose. Symptoms include diarrhoea, bloating, and abdominal cramps following consumption of milk or dairy products.

To support a training session or competition athletes need to eat at an appropriate time so that all the food has been absorbed and their glycogen stores are fully replenished.

In order to replenish them the athlete needs to consider the speed at which carbohydrate is converted into blood glucose and transported to the muscles. The rapid replenishment of glycogen stores is important for the track athlete who has a number of races in a meeting. The rise in blood glucose levels is indicated by a food's Glycaemic Index GI - the faster and higher the blood glucose rises the higher the GI. High GI foods take 1 to 2 hours to be absorbed and low GI foods can take 3 to 4 hours to be absorbed.

Studies have shown that consuming high GI carbohydrates approximately 1grm per kg body within 2 hours after exercise speeds up the replenishment of glycogen stores and therefore speeds up recovery time.

Glycogen stores will last for approximately 10 to 12 hours when at rest sleeping so this is why breakfast is essential. Eating meals or snacks a day, will help maximise glycogen stores and energy levels, minimise fat storage and stabilise blood glucose and insulin levels.

What you eat on a day-to-day basis is extremely important for training.

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